In each live client call, whether it be with a group or my 1-1 clients, I always begin with a quick check-in, asking: “How are you today?” 

Art of conversation

It’s a quick way to get grounded and fully present with what’s going on – for ourselves, for the others in the room / on the call, and for us collectively as a group.

 

If it’s a group event, we all take turns and share 1-2 words (or sentences depending on timing and purpose of our call).


Feedback from this simple kick-off activity includes:


* “Wow! It feels really good to get it out of my head and onto the page!”


* “Phew, what a relief to see that, I didn’t realize it until now!”

* “I guess I got a lot more done than I thought this week! “I’m further along than I thought!”

* “I didn’t know how upset I was about that subject!”


* “I feel much calmer and ready to work!”Art of conversation

* “Wow, we all have a lot going on. Glad to hear I’m not the only one!”


And that’s before we dive into the meat of it and get the substantive work of our call done!!

 

Setting the tone with these quick check-ins is important with any conversation, no matter the purpose of the gathering. It’s especially important in our increasingly virtual world, where most of us are not in the same room.

And with things changing quickly amidst our global pandemic, check-ins may vary widely from person to person and week-to-week. It’s essential to take the temperature of each person and the whole room each time.

We then take a moment to reflect on who and how we are that day, and harvest any a-ha’s or new insights gleaned. These can be realized from our own selves, each other and about the collective (all of us)!

 

Sometimes we’ll all be in the same place and other times all over the place. There’s no right or wrong; it’s the understanding of it that is of import.

We also get to declare we are being fully present, here and now. We are bringing our whole selves to this call. To do this is simple: leaving behind all that’s going on in our lives for the hour or day we are together. Art of conversation

We can always pick it up again at the end of our time together, if we so choose. Or not. 

 

The same “checking in” principle applies for my 1-1 client calls.

 

In fact, we will likely spend even more time on checking-in: things top of our mind can be a great insight into our deeper, foundational values and beliefs.

We then move to the meat of the call: discussing what you’re working on, including celebrations, decisions and declarations, and of course moving thru any stoppages or slowdowns you’re having.


Because getting stuck is just a good reason to find a better way, a smarter solution, not to quit altogether!

Much of the stickiness comes down to identifying our existing beliefs, seeing if they are true or not, and re-framing or re-writing them with an empowering context that inspires us to aligned actions!

It is a simple concept, but not always easy in practice. And just like any practice, takes many intentional repetitions to lock in as our new truth. 

The good news is that each one brings new freedom, expansion and avenues for inspired action! Art of conversation

At the end of every call or event, we’ll also “check-out” with a closing quote. 

It’s a way to complete our time together, to close the loop on this interaction. And to both give and get feedback on how the experience was for the other person.

In fact, I often do this informally in my personal conversations as well. In both opening the discussion and completing it.

Not because I’m coaching (unless invited to); rather because it’s a sweet way to meet and greet someone and to say goodbye for now as we depart. 

Try it in your own client calls and personal convos!

Then leave a comment below how it goes (both for you and others).

I’m curious to hear how this simple practice works for you too!

And if you’re ready to uplevel your already awesome life, email me today: we’ll determine which of my current offerings works best for you now, and get started this week!

Cheers,

hannah

hannah@hannahsanford.com

www.hannahsanford.com