This past month we were gifted two fabulous fights: Canelo v GGG 2 and AJ v Povetkin. If you missed them live, I highly recommend watching the full fights. Even the undercards were top notch.

 

Watching these two great matchups had me reflecting on my own experiences in the ring. In doing so, I realized it was rich with learning, including many practical applications outside the ring too. 

 

We all have inherent tendencies, which when developed can bring out the best in us and our work. 

 

I have always had pretty good focus, when I allowed myself to get into the flow. But boxing took that capacity to another level. 

 

Another one of my tendencies is to test myself. I took up boxing for fun and self defense but also to see how well I could do in learning the new skillset: in boxing, that means getting into the ring for a fight. 

 

I quickly learned that there’s nothing like a fight date on my calendar to instill an anal-spincter squeezing ability to focus! 

 

Because when a fighter steps into the ring or octagon, anything can happen. It’s life or death: any one punch can knock you – or the other guy – out cold. You really must “protect yourself at all times”. If you’re not buying that, watch some classic fights and movies. 

 

So how do fighters prepare for such a life-or-death occasion? 

 

Training camp!

 

It’s a time, place and people specifically set aside for fight night preparation. Every aspect of training camp is focused only on the fight. No distractions. The mood is light and relaxed, but serious at the same time. 

 

In both my athletic and artistic endeavors, I’ve learned it’s essential to develop the time, space and people who allow and encourage (and even demand of me) that level of single-mined focus that I must maintain to win the fight – or deliver on any other event: a client event, and art exhibition, etc. 

 

While I have not yet had the privilege of experiencing a total immersion-style training camp a la professional fighters do, it’s become clear that some of the habits I developed when training to fight I’m now applying to my business.  They include:

 

*Time every day dedicated to training 

The time of day or amount of time each day may change, the activities often vary, and the presence or absence of various people may too, but the work (mental and physical) goes in every single day. 

 

*No distractions during training

I setup my physical environment with only those things needed for the task at hand, including turning off all electronics: I will check calls, emails and social up to a couple times a day; but not during those daily training camp times.

 

*Preparing ahead of time for training

I setup my tomorrow tonight: my mind is prepared by writing out my agenda for the day, and my body is prepared by setting up my gear the night before so it’s all ready to go first thing in the morning. 

 

*Reviewing my training performance daily

At the end of every day and week I check-in on how I did, just like an athlete watching video of their performance. There are activities I track every day for long-term goals, as well as shorter project-specific reviews such as for the client event just completed or the painting series currently on my easel.

 

*Having the right training partners 

A fighter’s corner can make or break their fight! It’s key to have coaches, sparring partners and loved ones in our lives are 100% there… regardless of any sweat, snot, bruises, and bloody noses we may incur. 

 

*Time away from training to rest and reboot 

A good night’s sleep goes without saying; but I’ve noticed better performance when I’m also making time each day for restorative activities like power naps, meditation, and a nature walk, as well as regular time away from training altogether. It’s good to get outside the gym and our other normal patterns of daily living!

 

Do any of these work for you too? 

 

Or do you have other daily activities that work best for you?

 

Share with us in a blog comment below!

 

Cheers, 

Are you planning a strategic planning offsite, group brainstorming session or an executive leadership event?  

 

Contact me today! I’d love to be of service to you in co-creating the best possible training camp atmosphere and experience for you and your team!

 

603-380-3366

www.hannahsanford.com

 

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